Mariners to stand down staff and players

Waspish

Well-Known Member
This is all quite surreal really.
If there is a club at the end of all this it's going to be a very different one
 

turbo

Well-Known Member
Stood down isn’t the same as laid off and it’s happening across industries and with far richer companies than the club. As tempting as it is to pile on the ‘classic mariners’ or ‘peak a league’ bandwagon this is a huge issue and the government response shows that. As harsh as it is the players are one of the last groups I’m worried about atm.
 

Capn Gus Bloodbeard

Well-Known Member
and what about the government payments to keep people employed?
Personally I feel more for the office staff than the players - but it's worth worrying about the players too; plenty aren't on 6 figure incomes.

I thought that Shaun indicated playing behind closed doors would help our finances - I wonder what the impact was of not playing?
To put it another way - I'd be interested to know if we're financially worse off - and how/why - or if some owners are being opportunistic. Not making an accusation, just querying.
 

priorpeter

Well-Known Member
and what about the government payments to keep people employed?
Personally I feel more for the office staff than the players - but it's worth worrying about the players too; plenty aren't on 6 figure incomes.

I thought that Shaun indicated playing behind closed doors would help our finances - I wonder what the impact was of not playing?
To put it another way - I'd be interested to know if we're financially worse off - and how/why - or if some owners are being opportunistic. Not making an accusation, just querying.
He mentioned we’d actually take a financial hit from the Jets & WSW games if we were to play them behind closed doors.
 

Capn Gus Bloodbeard

Well-Known Member
He mentioned we’d actually take a financial hit from the Jets & WSW games if we were to play them behind closed doors.
Ahh, now I think back, if memory serves we had MCY that weekend, and I think he said we'd probably lose more money open than closed with them...
so I guess those 2 games in particular we'd lose less money playing open than closed because of higher crowds expected to some others?

What I was thinking of and forgot to mention in my previous post is, I wonder how sponsorships are affected here as well, if at all - and if that's part of the problem.

If I worked for the club, I'd be absolutely pissed that I work for a couple of multimillionaires but I've been sent to Centrelink.
 

bikinigirl

Well-Known Member
and what about the government payments to keep people employed?
Personally I feel more for the office staff than the players - but it's worth worrying about the players too; plenty aren't on 6 figure incomes.

I thought that Shaun indicated playing behind closed doors would help our finances - I wonder what the impact was of not playing?
To put it another way - I'd be interested to know if we're financially worse off - and how/why - or if some owners are being opportunistic. Not making an accusation, just querying.
. the biggest hit is/will be the fox money ... everything else pales into insignificance*

* from a financing point of view, not considering peoples livelihoods obviously
 

Capn Gus Bloodbeard

Well-Known Member
. the biggest hit is/will be the fox money ... everything else pales into insignificance*

* from a financing point of view, not considering peoples livelihoods obviously
you know....I feel like that should have been bleedingly obvious to me :santa::santa: of course, forgot that gets pulled.
 

pjennings

Well-Known Member
Phillip Micallef tweeting that


I've just learned from a reliable source that Foxtel is legally bound to pay its latest rights instalment unless it goes into liquidation. If the HAL
does not return by May that's another thing.
 

sydmariner

Well-Known Member
'We are at risk of regressing' - PFA seek FFA help after Mariners stand-down



01:03 / 14:55

Central Coast have become the second A-League club confirmed to stand down players and staff as the financial pitch of the coronavirus pandemic hits.
Professional Footballers Australia (PFA) announced on Tuesday they had received confirmation from Mariners players that they had received stand down notices.
The Mariners decision comes after Perth Glory owner Tony Sage took similar steps last weekend - and then predicted all other clubs would follow suit.
Just like they did with Sage, the PFA have issued Mariners owner Mike Charlesworth with a letter of demand seeking the immediate reinstatement of players.

"These actions undermine attempts for our game to overcome common challenges, fight for common interests and re-establish our sport," PFA chief executive John Didulica said.
"While other codes have fostered unity and demonstrated leadership amid crisis, we are at risk of regressing to the lowest common denominator."
AAP understands Brisbane Roar players and staff have also been stood down amid concerns a $900,000 quarterly payment to clubs by broadcaster Foxtel will not be made due to the league's suspension amid the COVID-19 outbreak.
FFA officials are reportedly starting the hunt for a new broadcaster with concerns growing that Fox Sports will walk out on its $57 million-a-year deal.
Didulica said his organisation had written to FFA to ask that they follow the lead of other sporting codes in this country and find a collective and uniform solution for the sport.
Despite the concerns, Sydney FC chief executive Danny Townsend is optimistic professional football will continue in Australia after the outbreak and its subsequent restrictions have passed.
The Sky Blues have placed all non-essential staff on paid leave until the end of April but Townsend admits the club will have to assess their position if the postponement drags on.
"Football in this country has come a long way and we're not going to let this situation unsettle that," Townsend said
"Obviously it's going to have an impact and what we look like coming out of this is probably different to what we look like going into it.
"That's probably every business in Australia, not just football... but I definitely think professional football will remain as it were before and we'll just have to adapt with the necessary financial impacts that will come down the line."
 

pjennings

Well-Known Member
If Foxtel pay up would we have lost 30% of our revenue ? If no then the $750 a week wage subsidy does not apply. If Foxtel pay up then we should keep them on.
 

bikinigirl

Well-Known Member
'We are at risk of regressing' - PFA seek FFA help after Mariners stand-down



01:03 / 14:55

Central Coast have become the second A-League club confirmed to stand down players and staff as the financial pitch of the coronavirus pandemic hits.
Professional Footballers Australia (PFA) announced on Tuesday they had received confirmation from Mariners players that they had received stand down notices.
The Mariners decision comes after Perth Glory owner Tony Sage took similar steps last weekend - and then predicted all other clubs would follow suit.
Just like they did with Sage, the PFA have issued Mariners owner Mike Charlesworth with a letter of demand seeking the immediate reinstatement of players.

"These actions undermine attempts for our game to overcome common challenges, fight for common interests and re-establish our sport," PFA chief executive John Didulica said.
"While other codes have fostered unity and demonstrated leadership amid crisis, we are at risk of regressing to the lowest common denominator."
AAP understands Brisbane Roar players and staff have also been stood down amid concerns a $900,000 quarterly payment to clubs by broadcaster Foxtel will not be made due to the league's suspension amid the COVID-19 outbreak.
FFA officials are reportedly starting the hunt for a new broadcaster with concerns growing that Fox Sports will walk out on its $57 million-a-year deal.
Didulica said his organisation had written to FFA to ask that they follow the lead of other sporting codes in this country and find a collective and uniform solution for the sport.
Despite the concerns, Sydney FC chief executive Danny Townsend is optimistic professional football will continue in Australia after the outbreak and its subsequent restrictions have passed.
The Sky Blues have placed all non-essential staff on paid leave until the end of April but Townsend admits the club will have to assess their position if the postponement drags on.
"Football in this country has come a long way and we're not going to let this situation unsettle that," Townsend said
"Obviously it's going to have an impact and what we look like coming out of this is probably different to what we look like going into it.
"That's probably every business in Australia, not just football... but I definitely think professional football will remain as it were before and we'll just have to adapt with the necessary financial impacts that will come down the line."
. primarily to play devil's advocate ... would a bit of regression (from the PFA's perspective) really be a bad thing for the league?

. nobody has been making any money, the league's main benefactor apparently wants out and anecdotally there are a few too many average footballers earning above average wage

. sustainability was already too tough, the beer virus won't improve that ... everybody else is suffering - how much hurt will the PFA take for the greater good? if their stance is 'no regression' - their impact could be the opposite of their intention
 

Tim

Active Member
Many businesses standing down staff in this unprecedented situation. Through no fault of their own, players aren’t playing and the club that already loses money when they do has zero income. No doubt it has to do this to give itself any chance of coming out the other side. Australian players and staff should qualify for some government assistance but I certainly feel for them (as I do any worker in this situation). One can’t blame Charlesworth this time from doing what he must to try and keep the ship afloat in some capacity...
 

pjennings

Well-Known Member
. primarily to play devil's advocate ... would a bit of regression (from the PFA's perspective) really be a bad thing for the league?

. nobody has been making any money, the league's main benefactor apparently wants out and anecdotally there are a few too many average footballers earning above average wage

. sustainability was already too tough, the beer virus won't improve that ... everybody else is suffering - how much hurt will the PFA take for the greater good? if their stance is 'no regression' - their impact could be the opposite of their intention

Agree completely - now is the time to work with the FFA and clubs - not negotiate by press release.
 

pjennings

Well-Known Member
Many businesses standing down staff in this unprecedented situation. Through no fault of their own, players aren’t playing and the club that already loses money when they do has zero income. No doubt it has to do this to give itself any chance of coming out the other side. Australian players and staff should qualify for some government assistance but I certainly feel for them (as I do any worker in this situation). One can’t blame Charlesworth this time from doing what he must to try and keep the ship afloat in some capacity...
Apparently FFA seeking some FIFA. Johnson having worked there shouldn't hurt
 

Big Al

Well-Known Member
If Foxtel pay up would we have lost 30% of our revenue ? If no then the $750 a week wage subsidy does not apply. If Foxtel pay up then we should keep them on.
We have lost ticket revenues and possibly sponsorship. Should make the 30% off that.
remember it’s turnover so gate etc counts but not the expenses
They may even be better getting fox to defer the payments to help everyone qualify
 
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